Author Topic: Feds to issue new medical marijuana policy  (Read 2621 times)

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Offline laughingwillow

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Feds to issue new medical marijuana policy
« on: October 19, 2009, 09:14:25 AM »
Feds to issue new medical marijuana policy

Oct 19, 8:07 AM (ET)

By DEVLIN BARRETT

WASHINGTON (AP) - Federal drug agents won't pursue pot-smoking patients or their sanctioned suppliers in states that allow medical marijuana, under new legal guidelines to be issued Monday by the Obama administration.
Two Justice Department officials described the new policy to The Associated Press, saying prosecutors will be told it is not a good use of their time to arrest people who use or provide medical marijuana in strict compliance with state law.
The guidelines to be issued by the department do, however, make it clear that agents will go after people whose marijuana distribution goes beyond what is permitted under state law or use medical marijuana as a cover for other crimes, the officials said.
The new policy is a significant departure from the Bush administration, which insisted it would continue to enforce federal anti-pot laws regardless of state codes.........

http://apnews.myway.com/article/20091019/D9BE5D2G0.html
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Offline cenacle

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Re: Feds to issue new medical marijuana policy
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2009, 10:53:24 AM »
Here's another link. GOOD NEWS!!
http://tiny.cc/gwvHl

Offline laughingwillow

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Re: Feds to issue new medical marijuana policy
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2009, 10:12:57 AM »
The article linked below addresses the question of how the recent Fed announcement might possibly affect the position of individual states (including my home state) contemplating MMJ laws.
 
http://www.slate.com/id/2232915/

quote from article: ..... On the one hand, the decision to defer to state laws means that existing local drug policies—however strict or lax—will remain in place. But on the other, many states take their cues from the federal government when it comes to drug policy. States could take the new policy as a tacit nod from Uncle Sam to go ahead and allow medical marijuana back home....

And this is where it gets really interesting, imo........

quote continued: Most states take their cues from the federal government on drug policy. The practice traces back to passage of the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, which aimed to create a uniform set of drug regulations across the country. During the drug war in the 1980s and '90s, the federal government started awarding grants to help states with law enforcement in exchange for aligning their drug policies with federal guidelines. So when the federal government signals its preference not to pursue medical marijuana users, states may take the cue......
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Offline cenacle

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Re: Feds to issue new medical marijuana policy
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2009, 12:06:26 PM »
The following is from the Marijuana Policy Project, 11.4.2009:

Great news! Two marijuana-related ballot initiatives, one in Maine and one in a ski town in Colorado, won in voting booths on Tuesday.

By 59%-41%, Maine voted to become the third state to license nonprofit dispensaries to provide medical marijuana to qualified patients.

And by an overwhelming 73%-27%, Breckenridge, Colorado voted to allow adults over the age of 21 to possess up to an ounce of marijuana. The Breckenridge initiative was spearheaded by MPP grant recipient Sensible Colorado.

Maine's new law is enormously important. While 13 states permit medical marijuana use, until now only Rhode Island and New Mexico have had laws allowing dispensaries, both of which were adopted by the states’ legislatures. Patients in the other states have had to grow their own marijuana, find someone to procure it for them, or buy it from the criminal market.

Tonight's vote is a dramatic step forward, the first time that any state’s voters have authorized the state government to license medical marijuana dispensaries. Coming a decade after passage of Maine’s original marijuana law in 1999, this is a huge sign that voters are comfortable with these laws, and also a sign that the recent change of policy from the Obama administration is having a major impact.

The new Maine law also expands the number of conditions that make a patient eligible for medical marijuana use and protects patients from discrimination in employment, housing, education, and child custody.

A coalition of activists and marijuana policy reform organizations are responsible for this victory: MPP got the momentum going by drafting the initiative and providing start-up funding to Maine Citizens for Patients' Rights, and the Drug Policy Alliance provided assistance to help complete the signature drive.