Author Topic: Fruit  (Read 7310 times)

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Offline boomer2

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Re: Fruit
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2008, 08:26:04 AM »
Part Nine:
A tray ready for placing in the sun to cure and dry.

[attachment=2:3lfpb0g5]tobacco10abc.jpg[/attachment:3lfpb0g5]

Bamboo screens placed in the sun show both dried tobacco and fresh tobacco in the process of drying

[attachment=1:3lfpb0g5]tobacco11abc.jpg[/attachment:3lfpb0g5]

There are several  thousand small farms in the southern provinces of Thailand from Surat Thani, province all the way down to Yala near the Malaysian border where the tobacco manufacturing plant is located.  In all parts of Thailand and Malaylasia, there are similar growers by the thousands and numerous tobacco plants which grow commercial local tobacco.

The actual Thai cigarette market is dominated by R. J. Reynolds who control all America and foreign tobacco sold in Thailand, except that sold on the black market.  currently, during the past 8 years, Thai parliament has attempted to curd cigarette smoking amongst young thai citizens.  With quite a good success rate.

And finally here is a private stash box of one of my friends who lives at this Coconut Grove farm in Ban Thurian with Tobacco and home made  bamboo rolling papers.

[attachment=0:3lfpb0g5]tobacco12abc.jpg[/attachment:3lfpb0g5]

Boomer 2

see below for a close up of the lumpaeow used to chop the leaves with a cleaver and also a package of the finished manufactured tobacco from the company in Yala, Thailand who package and sell the tobacco to vendors in southern Thailand. The tobacco is 5 baht a bag and the papers are 5 baht a package.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2008, 09:16:32 AM by boomer2 »
God is a plant known as the Earth!

Offline boomer2

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Re: Fruit
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2008, 08:44:05 AM »
Part Ten:
The packaging of the home grown tobacco.

[attachment=2:3r4ug96s]tobacco13abc.JPG[/attachment:3r4ug96s]

The actual tobacco obtained from the above packaging:

[attachment=1:3r4ug96s]tobacco14abc.JPG[/attachment:3r4ug96s]

And for a last image,  a package of the bamboo rolling papers for the tobacco, sold separately by vendors and in certain stores such as Thai 7-11's.

[attachment=0:3r4ug96s]tobacco15abc.JPG[/attachment:3r4ug96s]

I might also like to note that the actual article I am writing will have close to 40-45 images in the article and will appear hopefully in the Journal of Economic Botany.

Dr. Merlin just recently published a nice additional photo pictorial on the Opium Poppy as an update to his government book, "On the Trail of the Ancient Opium Poppy."

boomer.
God is a plant known as the Earth!

Offline Anonymous

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Re: Fruit
« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2008, 05:32:01 PM »
Boomer awesome posts! Thanks dude!

Offline Amomynous

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Re: Fruit
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2008, 11:27:16 PM »
Quote from: "Teotzlcoatl"
I basically want to grow the best fruits with the most nutrients and vitamins... can anybody think of any other super fruits?

Blueberries are an excellent food.  High in some vitamins, containing phytochemicals that can help fight cancer and protect the brain. And they taste good.

As an added bonus if you're in the US, they are a native plant, and thus good from a biospheric perspective.

Stay away from the patented and hybrid varieties. Get something as close to native/wild as possible.

Offline Cassie

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Re: Fruit
« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2008, 05:34:16 AM »
I have a mature Inga Bean and am not sure if it is really worth the space in my small yard. The 'ice-cream' part is quite nice but there isn't much of it and the beans are a bit yuk (imho).
I think an Avocado would be more worthwhile although they *do* grow HUGE.
A great thing for the vege garden is lettuce varieties that self-sow (also parsley). Then one always has some greens.
I have a brown turkey fig that produces awesome crops. I pruned it so I can sit up in there and share my feast with the birds.
Globe artichokes can be developed as a perennial bed - I have them as the front flower garden- they are a wonderful food source and look great.
Happy gardening!
all-love and longtime sunshine

Offline Anonymous

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Re: Fruit
« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2008, 11:49:35 AM »
Dude I love brown turkey figs!

Will you send me some cuttings?!

Offline Amomynous

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Re: Fruit
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2008, 03:50:17 PM »
Quote from: "Teotzlcoatl"
Dude I love brown turkey figs!

I don't know what a Turkey fig is, but if it's anything like a Turkish fig, you have to be careful. Hardiness really matters for fig trees. If you're in anything colder than Zone 7 or 8, you should make sure that the tree you're interested in will bear fruit were you are. I'm in a pretty marginal zone (6b) and there are some kinds of figs that will bear here, but most wont.

Offline dogbane26

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Re: Fruit
« Reply #22 on: November 20, 2008, 06:30:01 PM »
Ive tried lansones and rambutan when i was in the Phillipines.   Both were good but i liked Lansones better.

Lansones are actually not allowed to be imported into the US, but Canada doesn't care.  I was thinking of sneaking some back anyways but i didn't.

I guess even in the Phillipines lansones are seasonal so not available all the time and usually grown at a higher altitude so obviously not grown in Manila, but i think in Luzon or Quezon city .  

http://www.pbase.com/cmanaginged/image/33274412